Jesus Is Already There

Episcopal Church of the Holy Spirit
Alabaster, Alabama
The Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 16C)
August 25, 2019

Isaiah 58:9b-14
Psalm 103:1-8
Hebrews 12:18-29
Luke 13:10-17

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

bigstock-hands-begging-on-a-brown-backg-80780228I’m a huge fan of Brené Brown. If you’ve never heard of Brené, do yourself a favor. Go home, and look her up on the internet. You’ll come to discover that Brené is a well-known author and public speaker. An added bonus is that she also happens to be an Episcopalian, but you may not find that by doing a simple, Google search. Brené and her family live in Texas where she works as a professor at the University of Houston. Perhaps the most important thing that you should know about Brené is that she has spent a significant amount of her life and career as a researcher and storyteller. Her research has led her to collect data and conduct interviews in the areas of vulnerability, courage, shame, and authenticity. You might recognize her name from one of the books that she’s written or from her appearances on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday. Or, perhaps you’ve seen one of the videos floating around on YouTube featuring one of her TED Talks. I haven’t seen it yet, but most recently, she did a one-hour special on Netflix entitled “The Call to Courage.” She’s remarkably tuned in to so many of the destructive feelings that we, as a society, suffer from on a daily basis- feelings like shame, fear, and insecurity- and she’s inspired countless people with her healing and uplifting words of encouragement. Continue reading

Advertisements

A Sermon for the Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

The Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest
Abilene, Texas
Sunday, June 12, 2016

The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost + Year C
First Lesson: I Kings 21:1-10, 15-21a
Psalm 5:1-8
Second Lesson: Galatians 2:15-21
Gospel: Luke 7:36-8:3

✠ In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Rubens-Feast_of_Simon_the_Pharisee

Feast in the House of Simon the Pharisee by Rubens, c. 1618

I’m a huge fan of the author, Brené Brown. Now, if you have never heard of Brené, you should know from the very beginning that she is a native Texan, and she is an Episcopalian. So, of course, she has to know what she is talking about! Brené and her family live in the Houston area where she works as a professor at the University of Houston. Perhaps the most important thing that you should know about Brené is that she has spent a significant amount of her life and career as a researcher and storyteller. Her research has led her to collect data and conduct interviews in the areas of vulnerability, courage, shame, and authenticity. You might recognize her name from one of the books that she has written or from her appearances on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday. Or, perhaps you have seen one of the videos floating around on YouTube featuring one of her TED Talks. She is a remarkable public speaker and writer, and she has inspired countless people with her healing and uplifting words of encouragement.

In her book, Daring Greatly, Brené offers readers a helpful way to think about shame and how it has the power to prevent us from cultivating deep, meaningful relationships with other people and to make us doubt our sense of worth. She writes, “Shame is the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging.” In other words, shame is what we feel when we attach our self-worth to the things that we do or the things that happen to us in our lives. Continue reading