Extravagant Love

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, April 7, 2019

The Fifth Sunday in Lent
First Lesson: Isaiah 43:16-21
Psalm 126
Second Lesson: Philippians 3:4b-14
Gospel: John 12:1-8

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

1351-f9d833c2-5563-44ea-b16c-3c1e08c3d081If you spend any time on Facebook, you might’ve come across a page called “Episcopal Church Memes.” A “meme,” in case you’re unfamiliar with the term, is basically an image or a video that’s shared with a lot of people on social media, usually referencing something they find humorous or entertaining. To give you an example, there’s this famous meme called “Grumpy Cat, “featuring a brown and white cat with squinty eyes and a frown on his face. “Grumpy Cat” says lots of funny things, such as, “I had fun once. It was awful.” Or, “If I had a dollar for every time I thought of you, I would be broke.” It never ceases to amaze me how creative people get with the memes they post on Facebook.

Most of the images posted on the “Episcopal Church Memes” page are harmless enough, but occasionally, there’s one that gets pretty controversial, one that stirs up lots of different emotions and opinions. Continue reading

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Father, Forgive

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, February 24, 2019

The Seventh Sunday after the Epiphany
First Lesson: Genesis 45:3-11, 15
Psalm 37:1-12, 41-42
Second Lesson: 1 Corinthians 15:35-38, 42-50
Gospel: Luke 6:27-38

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

stock-photo-23785349During the evening hours of November 14, 1940, Nazi Germany sent over 500 bombers to raid the English city of Coventry. The Coventry Blitz, as it’s often called, lasted over ten hours, leaving more than 500 dead, 2,300 homes destroyed, and the town’s Gothic cathedral in ruins.

During the raid, many people in the town worked hard to try and save the cathedral from being totally lost in the flames, but they were unsuccessful. In the end, the only parts of the building still standing were the tower, the spire, and the outer wall. Everything else burned.

In the aftermath of the attack, the Provost of Coventry Cathedral, the Very Reverend Richard Howard, had two words inscribed on the wall behind the altar of the ruined building. “Father, forgive.” Notice that the inscription wasn’t “Father, forgive them.” Just “Father, forgive.” The Provost realized in that moment that the only way to break the endless cycle of violence and retribution was to choose love over hate. He realized that the only path toward peace and reconciliation is to acknowledge the fact that all of us are in need of forgiveness. All of us, no matter who we are or where we come from, need to be forgiven. Continue reading

The Love of God

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, February 3, 2019

The Fourth Sunday after the Epiphany
First Lesson: Jeremiah 1:4-10
Psalm 71:1-6
Second Lesson: 1 Corinthians 13:1-13
Gospel: Luke 4:21-30

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

holy-crossHave you ever seen those short, black and white, “Coffee with Jesus” comic strips on Facebook? Do you know the ones I’m talking about? If you’re on Facebook regularly and you’re friends with at least a few other Episcopalians, you might’ve come across these at some point. They feature a modern-day Jesus with dark, long hair and a beard. He’s usually pictured wearing some sort of business suit and holding a cup of coffee while he has a casual conversation with one or two other characters.

These “Coffee with Jesus” comic strips are usually light-hearted and funny, but they also tend to be very thought-provoking, using humor and sarcasm to illustrate deep, theological points about God and our relationship with God. Continue reading