A Sermon for the Third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 5B) + June 10, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, June 10, 2018

The Third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 5B)
First Lesson: Genesis
Psalm 15
Second Lesson: Hebrews 12:1-2
Gospel: Matthew 25:31-40

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

34962783_1765311520226763_8694390567460667392_nSeveral years ago, there was a story in the news about a new trend floating around on the Internet. You might’ve heard about it at the time. It was called the “Blasphemy Challenge.” Did you ever hear about this? The “Blasphemy Challenge” encouraged atheists and other non-believers to record videos of themselves denying the existence of the Holy Sprit and uploading them to YouTube for the whole world to see. When I first heard about it, I was curious to hear what people were saying in their videos. So, I went online and watched some.

To be honest, they were really hard to sit through. They made me uncomfortable.

I was struck by how much pain and suffering the people in these videos must have had to take time out of their busy lives to tell the whole world that they renounced God and the Holy Spirit. Continue reading

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A Sermon for the Feast of St. Catherine (Transferred) + June 3, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, June 3, 2018

The Feast of St. Catherine of Siena (Transferred)
First Lesson: Micah 6:6-8
Psalm 15
Second Lesson: Hebrews 12:1-2
Gospel: Matthew 25:31-40

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

34321059_1757782127646369_7588180409905577984_nWhen I first arrived at St. Catherine’s at the beginning of last year, one of the first things that caught my attention was this colorful greeting card posted on one of the bulletin boards next door in the Annex.

I later came to find out that it was a gift from our good friend, Judy Quick, who serves as a deacon in the Diocese of Alabama.

On the front of this greeting card was the following quote from Catherine of Siena, the patron saint of our parish: “Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire.” Continue reading

A Sermon for the Day of Pentecost + May 20, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, May 20, 2018

The Day of Pentecost + Year B
First Lesson: Acts 2:1-21
Psalm 104:25-35, 37
Second Lesson: Romans 8:22-27
Gospel: John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

33021429_10160827458235393_1579711863644487680_n“In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.”

These are the words of the prophet Joel, spoken by Peter on the Day of Pentecost.

Episcopalians often talk about how Pentecost is the day when we celebrate the birth of the Church. Some of us wear red to our worship services. We often have elaborate decorations and festive parties. Sometimes, we even have a birthday cake decorated with fiery flames or doves representing the Holy Spirit. All of that is wonderful, and I think we should definitely take the time to celebrate! After all, this is one of the seven principle feasts of the Church year. But, Pentecost is also a day for us to contemplate the importance of the Holy Spirit, the Advocate, which Christ himself promised to send to his disciples after he ascended to the Father. This is the day when the Holy Spirit descended upon the disciples in Jerusalem with tongues of fire, empowering them to carry out the mission of the Church. Continue reading

A Sermon for the Seventh Sunday of Easter + May 13, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, May 13, 2018

The Seventh Sunday of Easter + Year B
First Lesson: Acts 1:15-17, 21-26
Psalm 1
Second Lesson: 1 John 5:9-13
Gospel: John 17:6-9

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

32332166_1732015776889671_4793583441100668928_nWhen I was a child, I never dreamed that I would one day be a priest in the Episcopal Church. As a matter of fact, I didn’t even know the word “Episcopal” existed until I was a junior at Auburn.

I went to school to study music education with the hope that I would one day get a great job teaching choral music to high school students and enjoy a long career as a choir director. When I made the decision to study music in college, I felt sure that it was the right path for me to take. Music had been such an important part of my life in junior high and high school, and being a choir director was something I knew I could do well, something I knew I would enjoy doing.  Continue reading

A Sermon for the Third Sunday of Easter + April 15, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, April 15, 2018

The Third Sunday of Easter + Year B
First Lesson: Acts 3:12-19
Psalm 4
Second Lesson: 1 John 3:1-7
Gospel: Luke 24:36b-48

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

30233065_1703511999740049_689957896_oIn Luke’s account of the resurrection story, the risen Jesus says to his disciples, “Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things.”

“You are witnesses.”

Why do you think Jesus told his disciples this? It seems rather obvious, doesn’t it? Of course they’re witnesses. They’ve seen everything. They’ve traveled with Jesus since the very beginning of his ministry, through the best of times and worst of times. They’ve seen Jesus cure the sick and minister to the hopeless. They’ve heard his teachings and struggled to uncover their meanings. They’ve been his closest friends and allies. Continue reading

A Sermon for the Second Sunday of Easter + April 8, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, April 8, 2018

The Second Sunday of Easter + Year B
First Lesson: Acts 4:32-35
Psalm 133
Second Lesson: 1 John 1:1-2:2
Gospel: John 20:19-31

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

30125629_1695621980529051_1437411587_oToday’s lesson from the Gospel according to John picks up right where we left off last Sunday. In the evening on the day of resurrection, the risen Jesus mysteriously appears to his disciples for the first time.

Despite the doors of the house being locked where the disciples have gathered, Jesus appears. He says to his friends, “Peace be with you.” As evidence that he’s truly returned, Jesus shows them the mark of the nails in his hands and his side and he says to them once again, “Peace be with you.”

“Peace be with you.” These are comforting and familiar words to us as Episcopalians. I’m a little surprised that the disciples didn’t respond to Jesus, “And also with you.” Continue reading

A Sermon for the Feast of the Resurrection: Easter Day + April 1, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, April 1, 2018

The Feast of the Resurrection: Easter Day + Year B
First Lesson: Acts 10:34-43
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Second Lesson: 1 Corinthians 15:1-11
Gospel: John 20:1-18

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Screen Shot 2018-04-03 at 12.27.23 PM“I have seen the Lord!”

These are the first words spoken by Mary Magdalene to Jesus’ disciples soon after she discovers the risen Christ and runs to tell them all the wonderful news of what has happened.

“I have seen the Lord!”

You can imagine the excitement in her voice as she announces to the disciples that Jesus, their friend and master who was crucified, has indeed been raised from the dead.

But, if we back up a bit in our Gospel lesson for today, we know that Mary Magdalene doesn’t actually recognize Jesus at first. Rather, she sees and talks with a man who she assumes must be the gardener. Now, I don’t really know why she assumes that Jesus is the gardener. I doubt that Jesus is wearing a pair of overalls and a straw hat! All we know is that, when Mary turns from the two angels sitting in the empty tomb, she sees a man standing in the garden. The man asks Mary, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Assuming that the gardener has done something with Jesus’ body, she says to him anxiously, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Mary’s love for Jesus is evident in the way that she cares for him, even in death. Continue reading

A Sermon for Good Friday + March 30, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Friday, March 30, 2018

Good Friday + Year B
First Lesson: Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Psalm 22:1-21
Second Lesson: Hebrews 10:16-25
Gospel: John 18:1-19:42

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Screen Shot 2018-04-03 at 12.27.51 PM“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from helping me, from the words of my groaning? O my God, I cry by day, but you do not answer; and by night, but find no rest.”

The opening verses of Psalm 22 cut deeply, especially on this day.

They’re the words of someone in pain, of someone who has felt abandoned and forgotten.

They express feelings of great sadness and remorse.

They tap into the gut-wrenching story of Jesus’ final hours. In the Passion narratives from both Matthew and Mark, Jesus actually says these words out loud as he’s hanging on the cross. “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Continue reading

A Sermon for the Last Sunday after the Epiphany + February 11, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, February 11, 2018

The Last Sunday after the Epiphany
First Lesson: 2 Kings 2:1-12
Psalm 50:1-6
Second Lesson: 2 Corinthians 4:3-6
Gospel: Mark 9:2-9

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

27939340_1633849510039632_1598304361_nThirteen years ago, during my last semester at Auburn University, I was invited by my college priest to attend a weekend retreat in the Diocese of Alabama called Vocaré. Being new to the Episcopal Church at the time, I had no idea what to expect when I was first invited. I was simply told that Vocaré was a great opportunity for college students and young adults to explore how God might be calling to them in their lives, and after talking with friends who had already been to Vocaré, I decided that it might also be a wonderful way to grow in my relationship with God and to meet new people from around the diocese.

So, in February of 2005, I made the journey from Auburn to Camp McDowell in Nauvoo, Alabama, and I spent three days listening to fellow pilgrims share their stories about how God was at work in their lives. During our time at camp, we were invited and encouraged to explore our own sense of vocation and to ask ourselves important questions about who we are as disciples of Jesus. We spent time sitting by crackling fires in the dining hall at Camp McDowell playing games and singing cheesy camp songs. We shared meals and intimate conversations with each other, and we were comforted and surrounded by members of the staff who were there to care for us and to lift us up in their prayers during our journey. In short, I would describe Vocaré as a “mountain-top” experience, a moment in my life when time seemed to stand still and the cares and worries of the world seemed to melt away. Continue reading

A Sermon for the Second Sunday after the Epiphany + January 14, 2018

St. Catherine’s Episcopal Church
Chelsea, Alabama
Sunday, January 14, 2018

The Second Sunday after the Epiphany
First Lesson: I Samuel 3:1-20
Psalm 139:1-5, 12-17
Second Lesson: I Corinthians 6:12-20
Gospel: John 1:43-51

Now, O Lord, take my lips and speak with them. Take our minds and think through them. Take our hearts and set them on fire for your Gospel. In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

26943567_1605250556232861_988909064_n“Philip found Nathanael and said to him, ‘We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth.’ Nathanael said to him, ‘Can anything good come out of Nazareth?’ Philip said to him, ‘Come and see.’”

“Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” I love this question that Nathanael asks Philip in today’s Gospel lesson soon after Philip tells him that he’s discovered the Messiah. To me, there’s something so human about it, something so relatable. “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” This question makes me ponder the number of times in my life when I probably asked a similar question, a question based on my own skepticism or prejudice toward a particular person, place, or group of people before actually taking the time to get to know them. I think this is something that most of us wrestle with pretty frequently. We have preconceived notions about people that we don’t know and places that we’ve never been, and to our detriment, we let those preconceived ideas cloud our judgments and opinions. We let fear of the unknown control our thoughts and actions, and we let it get in the way of our ability to trust others and to love as Christ has called us to love. Continue reading